Past Fellows

Visiting Fellows 2021-2022

Jeffrey Binder

Jeffrey M. Binder specializes in humanistic perspectives on computation, especially in relation to issues of language. He has written on topics ranging from the history of the back-of-the-book index to the use of technical terms in Walt Whitman’s poetry; he has also developed numerous software experiments in computational text analysis and artistic uJeffrey M. Binder specializes in humanistic perspectives on computation, especially in relation to issues of language. He has written on topics ranging from the history of the back-of-the-book index to the use of technical terms in Walt Whitman’s poetry. He has also developed numerous software experiments in computational text analysis and artistic uses of artificial intelligence. His work has been published in such journals as ELHAmerican Literature, and Media Culture and Society; his most recent article, “Romantic Disciplinarity and the Rise of the Algorithm,” appeared in the Summer 2020 issue of Critical Inquiry. He is currently working on a book about the history of the idea of algorithm from the sixteenth century to the rise of machine learning.

Georgia Ennis

Georgia Ennis is a linguistic anthropologist specializing in media and the environment. Utilizing community-engaged and collaborative methods, her research explores Indigenous media production, language revitalization, and environmental knowledge in a changing climate. Her book-in-progress, Mothering Earth: Women, Media, and Cultural Reclamation in the Western Amazon, follows Amazonian Kichwa (Quichua) women as they mobilize media to strengthen relationships and knowledge key to environmental reclamation and food sovereignty.  At the CHI, she is also developing Voices of the Amazon, a digital archive of Amazonian Kichwa media. 

Predoctoral Fellows 2021-2022

My dissertation, “Encounters between Eshu and Dionysus. Afro-Greek mediations in Cuban and Brazilian theater,” inquires into the intersections of ancient Greek and African-based cosmologies and their mediations within Cuban and Brazilian performances. From the 40s up to the present, Afro-Atlantic religions such as Cuban Santería and Brazilian Candomblé have been transposed into the Cuban and Brazilian stages and interacted not only with different media and technology (theater, cinema, radio, puppetry), but also with Greek myths, dramas, and aesthetics. By dialoguing with multiple disciplines like Media and Theater Studies, Classical Reception, Race and Afro-Atlantic Studies, my project will explore the systems of mediations and structures (artifacts, technologies, and practices such as possession and ritual) involved in these Afro-Greek interactions and how they complicate important questions of Cuban and Brazilian history, such as national identity, race, gender and humanity.